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22nd of November 2017

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Juno Beams Back Stunning New Photos of Jupiter | Space Exploration | Sci-News.com

NASA’s Juno orbiter captured a series of beautiful images during its ninth flyby of Jupiter on October 24, 2017.

This image of Jupiter’s southern hemisphere was taken by NASA’s Juno spacecraft on October 24 at 2:11 p.m. EDT (11:11 a.m. PDT). At the time the image was taken, Juno was 20,577 miles (33,115 km) from the tops of the clouds of the planet at a latitude of minus 52.96 degrees. The color-enhanced view captures one of the white ovals in the ‘String of Pearls,’ one of eight massive rotating storms at 40 degrees south latitude on the gas giant. Image credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / SwRI / MSSS / Gerald Eichstaedt / Sean Doran.

This image of Jupiter’s southern hemisphere was taken by NASA’s Juno spacecraft on October 24 at 2:11 p.m. EDT (11:11 a.m. PDT). At the time the image was taken, Juno was 20,577 miles (33,115 km) from the tops of the clouds of the planet at a latitude of minus 52.96 degrees. The color-enhanced view captures one of the white ovals in the ‘String of Pearls,’ one of eight massive rotating storms at 40 degrees south latitude on the gas giant. Image credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / SwRI / MSSS / Gerald Eichstaedt / Sean Doran.

Juno launched on August 5, 2011, from Cape Canaveral, Florida, and arrived in orbit around Jupiter on July 4, 2016.

The spacecraft is in a polar orbit around the gas giant, and the majority of each orbit is spent well away from the planet.

But, once every 53 days, its trajectory approaches Jupiter from above its north pole, where it begins a 2-hr transit — from pole to pole — flying north to south.

This image of Jupiter is reconstructed from the JunoCam data taken during Juno’s ninth flyby of the planet. The image is approximately illumination-adjusted, and enhanced by a gamma stretch to the 4th power of radiometric data. Image credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / SwRI / MSSS / Gerald Eichstaedt.

This image of Jupiter is reconstructed from the JunoCam data taken during Juno’s ninth flyby of the planet. The image is approximately illumination-adjusted, and enhanced by a gamma stretch to the 4th power of radiometric data. Image credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / SwRI / MSSS / Gerald Eichstaedt.

During these flybys, Juno is probing beneath the obscuring cloud cover of the planet and studying its auroras to learn more about its origins, structure, atmosphere and magnetosphere.

On October 24, 2017, the probe successfully made its ninth (eighth science) flyby over Jupiter’s mysterious cloud tops.

This image of Jupiter was taken by Juno on October 24 and then processed by citizen scientists Gerald Eichstaedt and Sean Doran. Image credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / SwRI / MSSS / Gerald Eichstaedt / Sean Doran.

This image of Jupiter was taken by Juno on October 24 and then processed by citizen scientists Gerald Eichstaedt and Sean Doran. Image credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / SwRI / MSSS / Gerald Eichstaedt / Sean Doran.

This image of Jupiter was taken by Juno on October 24 and then processed by citizen scientists Gerald Eichstaedt and Sean Doran. Image credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / SwRI / MSSS / Gerald Eichstaedt / Sean Doran.

This image of Jupiter was taken by Juno on October 24 and then processed by citizen scientists Gerald Eichstaedt and Sean Doran. Image credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / SwRI / MSSS / Gerald Eichstaedt / Sean Doran.

This image of Jupiter was taken by Juno on October 24 and then processed by citizen scientists Gerald Eichstaedt and Sean Doran. Image credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / SwRI / MSSS / Gerald Eichstaedt / Sean Doran.

This image of Jupiter was taken by Juno on October 24 and then processed by citizen scientists Gerald Eichstaedt and Sean Doran. Image credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / SwRI / MSSS / Gerald Eichstaedt / Sean Doran.

“All the science collected during the flyby was carried in Juno’s memory until November 1, when Jupiter came out of solar conjunction,” said Juno project manager Edward Hirst, from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

“Juno’s science instruments and its JunoCam, a visible-light camera designed to capture remarkable pictures of Jupiter’s poles and cloud tops, were operating, and the new data are now being transmitted to Earth.”

According to NASA, Juno’s next close flyby of the gas giant will occur on December 16, 2017.

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